Archive for the ‘diy’ Category

From: http://www.artisopensource.net/2010/06/25/how-to-make-a-presentation-with-augmented-reality-using-processing/

This tutorial shows you how you can make a presentation using Augmented Reality. Code is done using ProcessingTUIO and reactivision.

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Art is Open Source and FakePress just released Knowners a link sharing plugin for WordPress.

Knowners screenshotKnowners screenshot

Knowners is a WordPress plugin developed by FakePress and Art is Open Source to setup an effective link publishing website.
The plugin is still in beta, but it already offers interesting possibilities.
It is thought as a large scale widget, usable inside your WordPress websites to setup a link sharing area on your web page.
You can publish links, categorize them with tags, automatically create relationships and taxonomies.

a screenshot of Knownersa screenshot of Knowners

This plugin is in its 1.0 version. It still has limited functionality. We are working on it. We would love to hear from you, with your suggestions on the features you would like to have.
Please check back soon for updates: we are releasing a new version in just a bit, with an enhanced link editing scheme (the current one is quite limited).

[ Download the Knowners plugin here ]

[ Download the Knowners Test Theme for WordPress here ]

[ Knowners plugin on WordPress ]

xDxD reads Creative Code by John Maeda while penelope prepares baked potatoes

While engaged in the deepest trance of coding, all one needs to wish for is any kind of numerical or symbolic resource, and in a flash of lightning it is suddenly there, at your disposal. The question is, Where is “there”? “There” is not inside your mind but inside the computer, a blurry space of symbols and numbers that focus in an ever-migrant pattern of sense and nonsense. Perhaps the only moment of clarity in the computer’s mind occurs when it crashes: All processing comes to a halt and any “there” that might have existed completely vanishes. If I were a computer, I would be happy to crash once in a while, because if it were not for the occasional crash, the computer’s human user would waste all of his or her life huddled over a pile f metal and plastic. If the computer truly loved its human, it would want the human to take a break once in a while. To crash is a noble act of sacrifice by the computer.

John Maeda, Creative Code

John Maeda, carrots and potatoes

xDxD reads Creative Code by John Maeda while penelope prepares baked potatoes


While engaged in the deepest trance of coding, all one needs to wish for is any kind of numerical or symbolic resource, and in a flash of lightning it is suddenly there, at your disposal. The question is, Where is “there”? “There” is not inside your mind but inside the computer, a blurry space of symbols and numbers that focus in an ever-migrant pattern of sense and nonsense. Perhaps the only moment of clarity in the computer’s mind occurs when it crashes: All processing comes to a halt and any “there” that might have existed completely vanishes. If I were a computer, I would be happy to crash once in a while, because if it were not for the occasional crash, the computer’s human user would waste all of his or her life huddled over a pile f metal and plastic. If the computer truly loved its human, it would want the human to take a break once in a while. To crash is a noble act of sacrifice by the computer.

John Maeda, Creative Code

Squatting Supermarkets was presented at AHAcktitude 2009

Here are the slides (they’re mostly pictures of the installation/software/performance)

Squatting Supermarkets

 

View more presentations from xdxd.
And here are some videos from the event:

for more info:

http://www.fakepress.net

Angel_F @ AHAcktitude, Nov. 27-29 2009, Milan

digital culture / events / features / people / performance

November 25, 2009 0



Artisti-attivisti, hacker artistici, attivisti socio-artistici, chiamateli come volete. I 600 iscritti alla lista AHA sono solo una parte di tutte quelle persone che, in Italia e nel mondo, sanno che il mezzo non è solo il messaggio, ma anche il massaggio e il mixaggio. Che non basta lamentarsi della tv (generalista, comunitaria o di nicchia), e neanche blaterare sulla comunicazione alternativa, e che occorre costruire esperienze, perché la comunicazione senza i corpi comunica solo i messaggi preconfezionati, e il corpo senza intelligenza produce solo manipolazione.

Per questo dall’anno scorso gli iscritti di AHA si incontrano di persona periodicamente, ogni volta in una città diversa, per aprire le scatole nere, per mettere le mani dentro i dispositivi della tecnologia, della comunicazione e dell’immaginario, per decostruire i saperi ufficiali e condividerne di nuovi, per lavorare all’intelligenza collettiva dei corpi e non a quella del capitale, per allargare la resistenza alla globalizzazione delle multinazionali e dei poteri costituiti.

AHAcktitude sarà una tre giorni di attività e di attivismo, di allegria e di condivisione, di studio e di divertimento. Tecnologia, musica, internet, letteratura, telecomunicazioni, marketing, social network: tutto sarà declinato all’insegna dell’open source e della messa in comune. Modi, approcci, atteggiamenti diversi ma comunicanti di esplorare, interpretare, agire la nostra condizione di esseri tecnologicamente modificati.

Perché gli esseri umani valgono più della merce, e non saremo soddisfatti finché la vita di chi ha qualcosa vale più della vita di chi non ha nulla.

AHA : Activism-Hacking-Artivism, è una mailing list nata nel 2002 all’interno del progetto AHA fondato nel 2001 da Tatiana Bazzichelli, aka T_Bazz. AHA vuole promuovere il networking, cioè la cultura di rete, soprattutto nella versione che lega le pratiche artistiche all’attivismo politico e sociale (“artivismo„).

Art is Open Source is going at Consciousness Reframed X conference organized by the Planetary Collegium in November 2009 at the Macromedia University of Applied Sciences in Munich. We’ll be there from November 19th to 21st.

We will present the Ubiquitous Anthropology project with FakePress. We will also present and use our little new project: Conference BioFeedback.

 

Conference BioFeedbackConference BioFeedback

You can check out the Ubiquitous Anthropology project on the FakePress Website and in the previous presentations you’ll find listed in the main page here at Art is Open Source.

So let’s take a look at Conference BioFeedback.

It’s a small USB gizmo intended to be worn or sewn on clothes. It connects you and your body to this website. This is a way of “publishing” emotions and sensations on bodies.

In this scenario: a war agains boring conferences!

We are really sensible on this matter: conferences are a really fundamental part of knowledge dissemination, and they could turn out to be even more focal in tomorrow’s education and cultural practices, as the ways of te network create more and more ways of connecting knowledges and information in these temporary, emergent occasions, suggesting really interesting alternatives to classrooms and universities.

The Planetary Collegium itself is interesting in this sense: a nomadic university creating an Excellence (yes, capitals) PhD across universities and centered around a series of periodic conference and a networked tutoring and mentoring process.

So we really do care about our conferences.

That’s why we created Conference BioFeedback!

The lecturer connects to the emotions of its audience: are they bored? happy? interested? excited?

Audiences can update their feelings about the conference using a website (from Fantastic to Terrible).

Bad ratings mean trouble for the boring lecturer, as ratings are translated into low voltage stimulations.

Fail in getting your fellow conferencers excited and you have a chance of being electrocuted right there. :)

My fellow FakePressers are calling this thing “a emotional publishing product for bodies“. But I’m sure I saw a grin when they saw I realized that it’s me who’s going to the conference in Munich and, thus, it’s me who’s going to wear the Conference BioFeedback gizmo.

and so.. got to get back to making the best-est powerpoint slides…

stay tuned for the updates from an electrocuted conferencer in Munich!

(… will keep you updated)

barcodes come to life

the Life of Things lets you peek into the secret lives of products and objects by transforming their barcodes into generative digital lifeforms.

done with Processing

there also is a small library i wrote to integrate in processing sketches the ZXING barcode decoding library.

See the little gadget here:

http://www.artisopensource.net/productslife/index.php

download the library and documentation here:

http://www.artisopensource.net/productslife/library.php

Folks, these are the best of times and the worst of times, as they say. I live a couple blocks away from Wall Street in a crummy apartment that is getting torn down as we speak. There are piles of ironic rubble everywhere. As I pack up electronics, copies of MAKE, and tools, it’s becoming clear to me that we have an historic opportunity to make things better, not just immediately, but for the future. We’re all likely to feel financial pressures with inflation; our dollars won’t go as far, so our interests and hobbies should be ones that give back. I’m pretty sure “DIY” is going to get even bigger, as more people will be making things. Some make because we want to, some because it’s all we’ll be able to do.

When we are young, we have lots of time, but not lots of money, so we play, we tinker, we explore. I think we’re going to have that opportunity again. The things we make, the tools we use, the books and resources we buy need to work harder for us and be things we not only learn from, but pass on to others, including children. We can spend more time together at meetups (MAKE, dorkbot, etc) and collectively form places, like hacker spaces and tool shops (NYCR, etc) to pool our resources. We can invest in hobbies that will give back, like electronics, woodworking, and DIY in general. Being able to make, fix, repair, and build might be the most important skills to develop. We really only have each other, and I think we’re all better off when we’re able to be self-reliant when we need to be.

We have a lot of challenges ahead. I’m an American and I tend to think that we are at our best when we are challenged the most. It doesn’t get more interesting than this. There are energy problems we’ll need to solve. There are education problems we’ll need to solve. If you’re a parent, you’re in the best possible position to help. You never know what will spark a kid’s interest, so you expose them to lots of things. I don’t have any kids (yet) but after a few years of doing Maker Faires and talking with thousands of parents, I know that electronics seem to be one of those things that kids go crazy with. I’m not sure how we’re going to make the world a better place, but I know we will need scientists and engineers.

As 2008 comes to a close soon, we’re doing everything we can at MAKE to inspire the current and next generation of Makers, who will be creating the next chapter in this story. We have a Maker Faire coming up in Austin (October 18-19). Tens of thousands of people will come together to celebrate making things. We also have a giant sale going on for the rest of the month (only a few days left): everything in the Maker Shed store is 10% off, and you get a free Maker’s Notebook automatically added to orders over $25. Use discount code CRZYDAN at the checkout. If you’ve been sitting on the sidelines waiting for a time to get started with electronics, this is it. Pick up a soldering set, a kit or two, and maybe an Arduino. There are dozens of people I know who got started and within just a few months were considering new careers; some have even started their own businesses making electronics.

I know there are lots of things you can do with your time and money, and I want to thank all the folks who support MAKE: everyone who visits our sites, watches our videos, reads our books and magazines, and comes to Maker Faire. We’re just one small group in a giant community that is trying to make things better. MAKE is just a collection of Makers; we didn’t create this group of people — they were and always will be out there. I hope we’re doing a good job celebrating this movement and inspiring folks. If you think there’s more everyone could do, I’m certain you will join in and help.